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 Spies & Espionage

Books on Secret Agents, Deception and Military Intelligence
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Anthony Blunt: His Lives
by Miranda Carter
Hardcover: 608 pages
Farrar Straus & Giroux; ISBN: 0374105316; (January 2002)

Blind Man's Bluff : The Untold Story of American Submarine Espionage
by Sherry Sontag
Listed under Cold War

Bodyguard of Lies: The Extraordinary Story Behind D-Day
by Anthony Cave Brown
On June 6, 1944-D-Day-six thousand Allied ships, the largest fleet in history, arrived off the French coast to begin the liberation of Europe. To their enormous relief, the Allies had obtained complete tactical surprise; the Nazi eagle slept. D-Day, which could have been one of history's bloodiest disasters, became instead one of its greatest victories. How this astonishing surprise was achieved is the subject of Bodyguard of Lies, one of the most exciting volumes ever written about the Second World War. Telling the most complete story of the biggest and most complicated intelligence operation in the history of war, Bodyguard of Lies presents a large and fascinating cast of heroes and rogues and sweeps through dozens of dramatic stories of plot and counterplot, stealth and treachery, lies and deceits. It provides the full story behind Churchill's agonizing decision not to warn the city of Coventry that it was about to be destroyed, and follows the deadly cat-and-mouse games between Allied agents in France and the Gestapo, the near fiasco of Montgomery's "double," who could not be kept sober, and the heroic but doomed efforts of the anti-Hitler German underground to eliminate the Fuehrer, including the role of the chief of the German intelligence service in passing secrets to the British. These and many more explosive stories, of code breakers and deceivers, of plots and ruses at the highest and lowest levels, make up the tapestry of this monumental book. The Publisher.
Paperback: 947 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 1.84 x 9.12 x 6.10
The Lyons Press; ISBN: 1585746924; (October 2002)

The Cambridge Spies : The Untold Story of MacLean, Philby, and Burgess in America
by Verne W. Newton
Madison Books; ISBN: 0819180599; (January 1991)

Camp 020: M15 and the Nazi Spies
by Oliver Hoare

A Century of Spies : Intelligence in the Twentieth Century
by Jeffrey T. Richelson
Paperback - 544 pages Reprint edition (July 1997)
Oxford Univ Pr (Trade); ISBN: 019511390X 

Charlie Wilson's War: The Extraordinary Story of the Largest Covert Operation in History
by George Crile
Listed under Charlie Wilson's War

The Cicero Spy Affair : German Access to British Secrets in World War II (Perspectives on Intelligence History)
by Richard Wires 
Hardcover - 288 pages (December 1999)
Praeger Pub Trade; ISBN: 0275964566

Code Breaking : A History and Exploration
by Rudolf Kippenhahn
Listed under Codebreakers

Codebreakers : The Inside Story of Bletchley Park
by F. H. Hinsley (Editor), Alan Stripp (Editor)
Listed under Alan Turing

Combined Fleet Decoded: The Secret History of American Intelligence and the Japanese Navy in World War II
by John Prados

The Crown Jewels : The British Secrets at the Heart of the KGB Archives
by Nigel West, Oleg Tsarev
In the early 1920s, the newly founded Soviet Union established intelligence-gathering networks in several Western European capitals. Initially charged with spying on White Russians and other enemies of the Bolsheviks, these enclaves soon turned to collecting information on all kinds of political and economic activities in their host countries--and also to recruiting foreign nationals to serve the Soviet regime. The Soviets, write British historian Nigel West and retired Russian intelligence officer Oleg Tsarev, were especially successful in Britain, where they were able to make use of a band of disaffected university-based intellectuals who went into government service and who, in time, turned from coffeehouse revolutionaries to active traitors: John Cairncross, Guy Burgess, Anthony Blunt, Donald Maclean, and, perhaps most infamous of them all, Kim Philby.
Hardcover - 384 pages (March 1999)
Yale Univ Pr; ISBN: 0300078064
Desperate Deception : British Covert Operations in the United States, 1939-44
(Brassey's Intelligence & National Security Library)
by Thomas E. Mahl, Roy Godson (Introduction)
Paperback: 224 pages
Brasseys, Inc.; ISBN: 1574882236; (November 1999)
Dirty Little Secrets of World War II : Military Information No One Told You About the Greatest, Most Terrible War in History
by James F. Dunnigan, Albert A. Nofi, James F. Dunningan
Paperback Reprint edition (March 1996)
Quill; ISBN: 0688122884

Dirty Little Secrets : Military Information You're Not Supposed to Know
by James F. Dunnigan, Albert A. Nofi (Contributor)
Paperback - 464 pages Reprint edition (January 1992)
Quill; ISBN: 0688112706

Dirty Little Secrets of the Vietnam War
by James F. Dunnigan, Albert A. Nofi 
Paperback: 400 pages
Griffin Trade Paperback; ISBN: 031225282X; (May 2000)

Espionage : The Greatest Spy Operations of the Twentieth Century
by Ernest Volkman
This amazing collection of real-life capers, con games, and subterfuges offers an eye-opening glimpse of the unseen forces behind the most important events of the twentieth century. Documenting twenty-eight secret operations, espionage expert Ernest Volkman unravels the mysteries and provides a shrewd assessment of the impact of covert activity on world history.
Paperback - 264 pages Reissue edition (September 1996)
John Wiley & Sons; ISBN: 0471161578
The FBI : A Comprehensive Reference Guide
by Athan G. Theoharis (Editor), Richard G. Powers (Editor), Tony G. Poveda (Editor)
This encyclopedic look at the Federal Bureau of Investigation takes advantage of changes in the Freedom of Information Act to move beyond the typical glamorized or sensational portrayal of this government agency to a scholarly, evenhanded account that places it within a greater historical context. It may be textbook in nature, but the guide still makes for entertaining reading, especially its "Notable Cases" chapter, organized by decade, which covers John Dillinger, the murder of Medgar Evers, Watergate, the World Trade Center bombing, and the Unabomber, among others. Another chapter examines the role of the G-man in popular culture over the last century by looking at the portrayal of agents in comics, movies, TV, and radio. The writers are a distinguished cast of university professors who have researched the FBI, written extensively about it, or gleaned an insider's knowledge of the organization. Most notable among these is Susan Rosenfeld, who served as the FBI's first official historian from 1984 to 1992. Each chapter, whether covering controversies or traditions within the bureau, portrays the agency's relations to the media, the president, Congress, or other law enforcement agencies, including previously unreleased details regarding the FBI's facilities and organizational structure. The guide also includes numerous surveillance and arrest photos, as well as demographics on bureau employees. It's useful for both those researching the FBI and those who are simply intrigued by the agency's complex role in American history. --Jodi Mailander Farrell -
Hardcover - 464 pages (December 1998)
Oryx Press; ISBN: 089774991X

Gentleman Spy : The Life of Allen Dulles
by Peter Grose
Listed under The CIA

In from the Cold : The Report of the Twentieth Century Fund Task Force on the Future of U.S. Intelligence
by Allan E. Goodman, Gregory F. Treverton (Contributor), Philip Zelikow 
Listed under Cold War

In Stalin's Secret Service: Memoirs of the First Soviet Master Spy to Defect
by W. G. Krivitsky, et al
Foreshadowing the Cold War, this memoir of espionage and intrigue cost its author his life at the hands of Stalin's secret police in the heart of Washington DC. To escape the closing trap of the OGPU, the sinister forerunner of the KGB, was an act of absolute desperation. Krivitsky, like Whittaker Chambers, was caught in the labyrinth of the great purges and left a crucially important document.
Hardcover - 344 pages 1st edition (August 2000)
Enigma Books; ISBN: 1929631030

Inside the CIA: Revealing the Secrets of the World's Most Powerful Spy Agency
by Ronald Kessler, Paul McCarthy (Editor)
Listed under The CIA

Killing Hope : U. S. Military and CIA Interventions Since World War II
by William Blum
Listed under Cold War

MacArthur's Ultra; Codebreaking and the War Against Japan, 1942-1945
by Edward J. Drea
Listed under Codebreakers

MI6 : Inside the Covert World of Her Majesty's Secret Intelligence Service
by Stephen Dorril
MI6, the foreign section of Great Britain's intelligence service, began life early in the 20th century with the charge of keeping tabs on "Red Russia," and, soon thereafter, on Nazi Germany. Less effective during World War II than its American counterpart, the Office of Strategic Services, MI6 came into its own during the cold war, when Britain's spymasters recruited bright young public-school intellectuals to play a modern version of the Great Game against their Soviet counterparts in the KGB and thwart Communist ambitions around the globe. 

The Soviets, writes English historian Stephen Dorril, were often a step ahead, helped along by British turncoats like Kim Philby, who provided Stalin with the names of MI6 operatives and later defected. And, like the CIA, the agents of MI6 were obsessed with conjuring elaborate schemes, including plots to assassinate Egyptian leader Gamal Abdul Nasser (with poisoned chocolates) and Serbian dictator Slobodan Milosevic (by means of a carefully engineered car crash). Busy planning elaborate endings to their enemies' lives, the British spies failed to comprehend important developments as they were happening, from the Belgrade-Moscow split of the late 1940s to the collapse of the Soviet bloc in the late 1980s. 

Such failures, lapses, and scandals have led to repeated calls for dismantling the agency, especially now that the cold war has ended. Even so, Dorril writes, MI6 enjoys a privileged position within the British government and is unlikely to see meaningful reform. Readers who know of British spydom only through the surprisingly accurate James Bond novels of Ian Fleming will find Dorril's densely detailed, often scathingly critical book to be an eye-opener. --Gregory McNamee -
Hardcover: 880 pages
Free Press; ISBN: 0743203798; (May 2000)

A Man Called Intrepid
Sir William Stephenson
Paperback - 486 pages (November 2000)
The Lyons Press; ISBN: 158574154X
The Man Who Never Was
by Ewen Montagu, Alan Stripp (Introduction)
One of the great deceptions of WW2.
Paperback: 160 pages
United States Naval Inst.; ISBN: 1557504482; (March 2001)
On Intelligence : Spies and Secrecy in an Open World
by Robert David Steele

The Secret War Against Hanoi : Kennedy and Johnson's Use of Spies, Saboteurs, and Covert Warriors in North Vietnam
by Richard H., Jr Shultz
Paperback: 448 pages
Harper Perennial; ISBN: 0060932538; (December 5, 2000)

A Spy's London : A Walk Book of 136 Sites in Central London Relating to Spies, Spycatchers & Subversives
by Roy Berkeley
Paperback - 384 pages (March 1997)
Combined Books; ISBN: 0850521130
Special Order

Spies : The Secret Agents Who Changed the Course of History
by Ernest Volkman
Both a solid reference work and an exciting read, authored by an acclaimed espionage historian and former prize-winning correspondent for "Newsday", this is a riveting real-life look at the masters of  the black art of espionage covering the true stories of agents, assets, dupes, moles, and amateur spies. It recounts many surprising espionage curiosities, such as Pope Paul VI's work for the CIA and Ernest Hemmingway's amateur spy ring in Havana, and tells the real stories of may famous spies, such as Mata Hari, British super-agent Ian Fleming and others.
Paperback - 288 pages (June 1997)
John Wiley & Sons; ISBN: 0471193615

The Sword and the Shield: The Mitrokhin Archive and the Secret History of the KGB
by Christopher M. Andrew, Vasili Mitrokhin
In 1992, a KGB agent defected to the west. With him came thousands of pages of information which he had compiled over 12 years while planning his escape. Db
Paperback: 700 pages
Basic Books; ISBN: 0465003125; (September 5, 2000)
This Grim and Savage Game: The OSS and U.S. Covert Operations in World War II
by Tom Moon (Introduction)
Paperback - 352 pages (June 20, 2000)
Da Capo Pr; ISBN: 0306809567

Traitors Among Us : Inside the Spy Catchers World
by Stuart Herrington
Paperback: 432 pages
Harvest Books; ISBN: 0156011174; 1 Harvest edition (October 2000)

Top Secret Intranet : The Story of Intelink : How U.S. Intelligence Built the Largest, Most Secure Network (Goldfarb Series)
by Frederick Thomas Martin
Paperback - 380 pages Bk&Cd Rom edition (January 1999)
Prentice Hall Computer Books; ISBN: 0130808989

Reflections of a Cold Warrior : From Yalta to the Bay of Pigs
by Richard M., Jr Bissell, Jonathan E. Lewis (Contributor), Frances T. Pudlo (Contributor)
Delivery sometimes delayed.
Hardcover (May 1996)
Yale Univ Pr; ISBN: 0300064306

The Red Orchestra : The Soviet Spy Network Inside Nazi Europe
by V. E. Tarrant
Paperback: 224 pages
Cassell Academic; ISBN: 0304351296; (August 1999)

Secret Agencies : U.S. Intelligence in a Hostile World
by Loch K. Johnson
Listed under Cold War

Sisterhood of Spies : The Women of the OSS
by Elizabeth P. McIntosh
Listed under French Resistance

Spying for America : The Hidden History of U.S. Intelligence
by Nathan Miller
Paperback - 512 pages 2nd edition (June 1997)
Marlowe & Co; ISBN: 1569247218

Spy Book : The Encyclopedia of Espionage
by Norman Polmar, Thomas B. Allen 
Paperback - 656 pages Rev&Updtd edition (July 1998)
Random House Reference &; ISBN: 0375702490

Venona : Decoding Soviet Espionage in America
by John Earl Haynes, Harvey Klehr
Listed under Cold War

Brassey's Book of Espionage
by John Laffin
Paperback (February 1997)
Brasseys Inc; ISBN: 1857531442
Out of print - Try Used Books

British Security Coordination : The Secret History of British Intelligence in the Americas, 1940-1945
by William Samuel Stephenson (Editor), Nigel West (Introduction)
Hardcover - 576 pages (June 1999)
Fromm Intl; ISBN: 088064236X
Out of print - Try Used Books

Sabotage and Subversion : The SOE and OSS at War
by Ian Dear
Paperback - 224 pages (May 2000)
Cassell Academic; ISBN: 0304352020
Out of print - Try Used Books

Ultimate Spy Book
by H. Keith Melton, William Colby, Oleg Kalugin

Historian H. Keith Melton is a specialist in 20th-century espionage; he's also quite a fan of espionage gadgetry. Both interests make strong showings in this heavily illustrated glimpse into the shadowy world of modern spying. Melton examines the role of clandestine intelligence in revolutionary Russia and Nazi Germany, analyzes modern spy rings, and profiles a number of important figures in the demimonde of spooks, among them British code breaker Alan Turing and Yugoslav double agent Dusan Popov. He also showcases some astonishing hardware, ranging from suitcase radios to shirt button microphones and mechanical pencil pistols. Former CIA director William Colby and former KGB general Oleg Kalugin, who recruited the American traitor John Walker, contribute forewords.
Hardcover (June 1996)
DK Publishing; ISBN: 0789404435
Out of Print - Try Used Books

Wild Bill and Intrepid : Donovan, Stephenson, and the Origin of CIA
by Thomas F. Troy
Book Description
In this gripping book, a former Central Intelligence Agency staff officer unveils the true story of the birth of CIA, arguing that the role of the British in the CIA`s formation was much more important than has been believed. Basing his story on interviews with key players and formerly secret American and British archives, the author addresses controversial claims and notions about the collaboration between William J. ("Wild Bill") Donovan, the CIA`s first chief, and William S. ("Intrepid") Stephenson, director of British intelligence in the U.S. during World War II. 
Hardcover - 259 pages (May 1996)
Yale Univ Pr; ISBN: 0300065639
Out of print - Try Used Books

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